Catholics as children

Detroit Archbishop Allen H. Vigneron warned his priests and deacons June 3 that they could be “dismissed from the clerical state” if they participate in a eucharistic liturgy June 12 closing an international American Catholic Council convention in Detroit.

The ACC, a coalition of liberal Catholic groups seeking changes in the church, said Vigneron’s warning brought a sharp spike in visits to its Web site, and in registrations for the convention.

The problem aside from Vigneron’s sad-making infantilization of his priests was that the ACC told him that there would be no such attempt.

It raises the decades old question: Can the Catholic Church tolerate much less embrace adult believers?

Vigneron is your classic JP ll “My way or the hwy” bishop who brooks no dissent even on non-infallible positions. He is simply another Roman imposition on the longsuffering and shrinking People of God (Catholic div) in Detroit.

Never was the ACC needed more as a balance to the right wing Republican bishops.

Among featured speakers on the ACC agenda is Sr. Joan Chittister, former prioress of the Benedictine Sisters of Erie, Pa. James Carroll,Boston Globe columnist and prolific writer longtime advocate of change Anthony Padovano and several other prominent Catholics…including Hans Kung by film.

A foundational document will be the core of this important conference. John Quinn and I representing newcatholictimes. org will be attending. http://www.newcatholictimes.com/

In light of these principles and precepts, we, mindful of our baptism, eager to be fully citizens of the United States and thoroughly Catholic, articulate this Catholic Bill of Rights and Responsibilities.
1. Primacy of Conscience. Every Catholic has the right and responsibility to develop an informed conscience and to act in accord with it.

2. Community. Every Catholic has the right and responsibility to participate in a Eucharistic community and the right to responsible pastoral care.

3. Universal Ministry. Every Catholic has the right and responsibility to proclaim the Gospel and to respond to the community’s call to ministerial leadership.

4. Freedom of Expression. Every Catholic has the right to freedom of expression and the freedom to dissent.

5. Sacraments. Every Catholic has the right and responsibility to participate in the fullness of the liturgical and sacramental life of the Church.

6. Reputation. Every Catholic has the right to a good name and to due process.

7. Governance. Every Catholic and every Catholic community has the right to a meaningful participation in decision making, including the selection of leaders.

8. Participation. Every Catholic has the right and responsibility to share in the interpretation of the Gospel and Church tradition.

9. Councils. Every Catholic has the right to convene and speak in assemblies where diverse voices can be heard.

10. Social Justice. Every Catholic has the right and the responsibility to promote social justice in the world at large as well as within the structures of the Church.
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